LosingAChild[1]

Rachel’s Vineyard – En español 2-4 octubre, 2015 – in English March 18-20, 2016

Rachel’s Vineyard

  • En español 2-4 octubre 2015
  • March 18-20, 2016 (English)
  • July 8-10, 2016 (English)
  • En español septiembre 30 a octubre 2, 2016

Project Rachel Contact Information
Paula Segno, Coordinator, projectrachel@scd.org
Office: (916) 733-0161
Fax: (916) 733-0195

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Podcast – Bob Dunning Interviews Diocese of Sacramento, Project Rachel Coordinator, Paula Segno (January 15, 2015)

This story in a pamphlet.

Jesus, I Trust in You   

Don’t be afraid. Draw close to my heart. There you will find the peace and happiness you seek.

Jesus speaks these words to every human being in every generation. He knows well that each of us is broken by sin and burdened by selfishness and past hurts.

As St. Paul has written, “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” Yet we are saved “by his grace as a gift, through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus.”

You may be thinking, “I don’t deserve to be forgiven. My sins are too great!” Thankfully, God’s love is greater than all the sins of all time. Jesus offers his grace and forgiveness to every repentant heart. All we have to do is ask and begin to trust in his mercy.

As Pope John Paul II wrote: “No human sin can erase the mercy of God, or prevent him from unleashing all his triumphant power, if we only call upon him.”

“I can draw a line through the middle of my life. On one side, before Project Rachel. On the other side, after. I no longer carry that heavy burden of guilt. Not only has Project Rachel helped me but also my whole family.”

A great 20th-century apostle of Divine Mercy, St. Faustina, recorded in her Diary the consoling words of Jesus: I want “all souls to trust in the unfathomable abyss of My mercy, because I want to save them all.” And He assured her that “the greater the misery of a soul, the greater its right to My mercy.”

The misery of a soul grieving from abortion calls forth an outpouring of God’s mercy.

Often those seeking confidential counseling have had more than one abortion. After an abortion, a woman may see herself as “worthless.” This feeling grows stronger if – as often happens – she and the baby’s father break off their relationship. If she becomes pregnant again, she may feel unworthy of being a mother, and fearful that she’d be a “bad mother,” unlovable and incapable of loving. So she has another abortion, and perhaps another, trapped in a cycle of despair and self-loathing.

“The process of healing from abortion isn’t about who you are and what you’ve done; it is about who God is and what He’s done.”

Thankfully, through Project Rachel – the Catholic Church’s post-abortion healing ministry – women can find forgiveness and peace of heart through compassionate counseling and the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

“After my abortion I was broken and desperate for help. I turned to Project Rachel. After the experience, I left feeling like a whole person again. Forgiveness became a reality for me, a feeling I never imagined was possible.”

What About Men?

Many men, too, suffer greatly in the aftermath of abortion – sometimes immediately, sometimes years later, though few express their pain openly. They are fathers who lost a child. They may have opposed the abortion. They may have failed to speak up or to change their partner’s mind because law and society continue to say it’s “her choice.”

They may have urged her to abort because, at the time, they didn’t want the responsibilities of fatherhood, yet later felt that they failed as a man to protect their loved one and child. Their grief is bottled up because our culture doesn’t make it easy for men to express such feelings. They may turn to workaholism, alcohol, drugs, or pornography to keep their painful thoughts and emotions at bay.

They, too, can find understanding, forgiveness, healing, and wholeness through the Church’s ministry of Project Rachel.

“As the father of an aborted baby I felt not only loss but failure. Through Project Rachel I was able to regain a sense of self-worth and return to my faith.”

My Daughter Had an Abortion and I Don’t Know What to Do

Today, more and more grandparents are coming to Project Rachel for help. If they were instrumental in the abortion decision of their daughter or their son’s girl- friend, they may feel both anger and unbearable guilt, especially if they have witnessed the tragic impact of abortion on their own child.

If they opposed the abortion or learned of it only afterward, grandparents can be torn by waves of conflicting emotions – grief over the loss of a grandchild, anger toward the daughter or son involved, mixed with com- passion for what their daughter or son is now going through.

Forgiveness and peace can also be theirs through Reconciliation and counseling.

“I can draw a line through the middle of my life. On one side, before Project Rachel. On the other side, after. I no longer carry that heavy burden of guilt. Not only has Project Rachel helped me but also my whole family.”

My Mom Had an Abortion

When children learn that a sibling died from abortion, they can experience a profound sense of loss and grief for the brother or sister whose love and companionship they’ll never know in this life. They may also feel conflicting emotions toward their mother or father, and even experience guilt and insecurities as a survivor sibling, constantly questioning why they deserved to live while their sibling didn’t. They can learn to forgive their parents and to develop a close and enduring spiritual bond with their brother or sister, in light of the Communion of Saints.


 

Project Rachel Contact Information
Paula Segno, Coordinator, projectrachel@scd.org
Office: (916) 733-0161
Fax: (916) 733-0195